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Luce Fellowship

The Luce Environmental Science to Solutions Fellowship Program is designed to educate Ph.D. students on the full trajectory from the identification of important environmental issues to the implementation of solutions. The Fellowship Program welcomes students from mathematics, life or physical science, social science, environmental science, or engineering. Luce Fellows will receive specialized training in leadership, communication, and data management. They also will have opportunities for collaborative research, real world problem-solving, and information sharing among science, policy, and corporate arenas. Students will experience the advantages of cross-disciplinary teamwork and will become acquainted with political, legal, and economic dimensions of environmental challenges.

The Luce Environmental Science to Solutions Fellowship is three years in duration. Fellowships have been awarded to two cohorts, one starting in 2008 and one starting in 2010. 

In their first year, Luce Fellows will

  • Receive $3,000 to be applied to studies, supplies, travel to professional meetings, or other activities that enhance the student’s educational experience.
  • Participate in a graduate seminar focused on the interface between science and policy.
  • Receive training in informatics.
  • Attend a working group of researchers and practitioners at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barbara.

In their second year, Luce Fellows will

  • Receive $3,000 to be applied to studies, supplies, travel to professional meetings, or other activities that enhance the student’s educational experience.
  • Receive training in communication of science to policy makers, media, NGOs, resource managers, and industry.
  • Initiate or participate in a two-year Luce Environmental Working Group at NCEAS. Each student-led working group will be provided with a project budget enabling participation of experts from outside the university.

In their third year, Luce Fellows will

  • Be encouraged to participate in the University of California’s Washington, D.C. or Sacramento programs.
  • Present the outcomes of their working group projects to an audience of non-academics.
  • Refine proposed environmental solutions that emerged from the working group’s activities based on feedback from practitioners, including elected officials and other policy makers.